Course Descriptions - Social Studies

Humanties 8  (MSS-08)

Humanities 8 is a study of the naturally complementary fields of Social Studies and English. There are many skills and processes common to both curricula.  Students will look at the connections between history (from 7CE-1750CE), geography and current events. These discussions will be linked to the study of literature and English skills and strategies: reading, writing, speaking and listening.  The integration of these subjects will allow to student to understand that academic skills are transferable.  The inter-disciplinary approach allows students to expand their knowledge of the world, broaden their skills and perspectives, and encourage students to become informed and educated citizens.

 

Social Studies 9 (MSS--09)

Continuing with Social Studies K-12 key curricular competencies of asking questions, gathering, interpreting, and communicating ideas, explaining significance, connecting with evidence, distinguishing continuity and change, recognizing cause and consequence, acknowledging perspective, and using ethical judgement, students will explore revolutions, colonialism, migration, nationalism, conflict, discriminatory policies (from 1750-1919CE) and Canadian geography. The goal of all social studies course is to expand students’ knowledge of the world, broaden their skills and perspectives, and encourage students to become informed and educated citizens.

 

Social Studies 10 (MSS--10) “Transition Curriculum”

Building on the skills, processes, and themes introduced and developed in earlier Socials and Humanities classes, Socials 10 may focus on the Nineteenth Century territories that became Canada during the era.  Ideas and issues of responsible governance, politics, identity, society, culture, economic development, domestic and international conflict, environment, and truth and reconciliation may be examined both individually and in relationship to one another.  (1919 CE-present) The goal of all social studies course is to expand students’ knowledge of the world, broaden their skills and perspectives, and encourage students to become informed and educated citizens.

 

Social Studies 11 (MSS--11) “Transition Curriculum”

Social Studies 11 is the culmination of the current compulsory Social Studies curriculum which is in effect for those graduating in 2019 and as such, deals with fundamentally important topics and issues that are basic to citizenship in Canada and the world.  Students may examine the historical background and structure of our legal system and our federal, provincial, and municipal governments. Students may also analyze contemporary issues such as the Constitution, the future of the federal system, separatism, and land claim settlements.  Other areas of study may include Canada’s growth as an independent nation in the 20th Century, its role in the global community including issues of war and peace, and socio-economic development.  Social Studies 11 may also draw from the upcoming new SS curriculum being implemented for students graduating in 2020 and beyond..

 

Comparative Civilizations 12 (MCCN-12)

“Myth is much more important and true than history.  History is just journalism and you know how reliable that is,” said mythologist Joseph Campbell.  

The aim of Comparative Civilizations 12 is to challenge and enrich students’ awareness of the history of other cultures through comparative studies. The course will examine the nature, development, and variety of our world’s cultures.  Comparative studies of both ancient and modern civilizations will be introduced throughout the year.  Themes such as mythology, time, and gender will be explored through the Social Sciences lenses of anthropology, philosophy, historical analyses, and aesthetic experiences.  Students are expected to conduct research, complete field studies, and report their findings

This course is open to Grade 11 and 12 students.  Grade 11 students should be aware that this is a senior elective with Grade 12 curriculum learning outcomes and expectations. This course is accepted at all Colleges and some Universities in B.C.  Please check with your counselor if you intend to use it as an entry qualification at university.

 

Geography 12  (Mgeo-12)

Do earthquakes rock your world? Do you care about human impact on the environment?  Is Iceland one of your dream destinations?  If so, Geography 12 may be the course for you!  Geography 12 is the study of physical, natural, and human elements of the global environment.  The course examines the characteristics, processes, distributions, and interactions among the physical components of the earth’s surface and the influence they exert over people’s activities.  There are three focal areas in the course: physical and biological processes (plate tectonics, gradational processes, earthquakes, volcanoes, climate, etc.); humans and their environment (resource management, environmental issues, etc.); and the future, including global human and environmental challenges.  Course work includes map interpretation, field studies, and in-class study.  Currently, McMath is in the planning stages of a field trip to Iceland (pictured above) in 2018.

 

Open to Grade 11 and 12 students.  Grade 11 students should be aware that this is a senior elective with Grade 12 curriculum learning outcomes and expectations.  This course is accepted at most colleges and universities as an academic credit suitable for post-secondary entrance

 

 

Social Justice 12  (MSJ--12)

Do you care about issues in the world?  Were you appalled by 2016 and its abuse of human rights in terms of race, ethnicity, poverty, genocide, women, LGBTQ and Aboriginal people?  Are you concerned about globalization and the manipulation of the media?  This course will be an important and rewarding use of your time at McMath.

 

Social justice is defined as “the full participation and inclusion of all people in society, together with the promotion and protection of their legal, civil, and human rights” (BC Ministry of Education, Social Justice 12 IRP).  The aim of this course is to raise students’ awareness of and increase their ability to analyze and advocate for issues of social equity and justice.  Through active participation, critical analysis, and reflection, students will learn about social justice issues and work towards becoming responsible agents of change.   Students will also research, develop and carry out a social action project based on self-selected topics.

 

Open to Grade 11 and 12 students.  Grade 11 students should be aware that this is a senior elective with Grade 12 curriculum learning outcomes and expectations. This course is accepted at some colleges and universities as an academic credit suitable for post-secondary entrance.

 

History 12 (MHI--12)

History 12 is an elective, survey course.   The core curriculum covers events of the 20th century but an examination and discussion of key events of the early 2000s (such as 9/11 (Sept. 11, 2001) along with current events is also an important part of the course. Students will study how politics, economics, science, art, fashion, sport, technology, pop culture, and media all play a role in shaping, reflecting, and making history.  Students will also develop the skills to study history objectively using a variety of primary and secondary sources.

 

The course is designed to broaden and deepen a student’s understanding of the various forces that have shaped historical events so as to better understand current events and a student's role and opportunity as an active citizen in a multicultural, democratic society.

 

Open to Grade 11 and 12 students.  Grade 11 students should be aware that this is a senior elective with Grade 12 curriculum learning outcomes and expectations. This course is accepted at most universities as an academic credit suitable for university entrance

 

Environmental Sustainability (YRNR-1A)

Open to students in grades 10-12

What are YOU doing to make the world a greener place? Environmental Sustainability 12 allows you to explore the background information about the world environmental crisis and what you can do.   You will learn the concepts, skills, and attitudes needed to understand the practices and issues related to environmental sustainability.  You will begin to understand climate change and the impact of humans on our natural world and the Earth’s resources.  You will reflect on your personal and collective impact on the environment and will select and explore an environmental focus for the course.  You will take action by creating, implementing, and evaluating a sustainable project in your school or community such as a school compost or recycling program.  Your goal is to diminish your ecological footprint, become more of a global citizen, and make a difference by becoming more socially responsible.